A Portrait Comes Home to Cranbrook House

The portrait of Clara Gagnier Booth, mother of Cranbrook founder George Gough Booth, has been mounted in the Oak Room at Cranbrook House. This painting is on long-term loan to Cranbrook from the Saginaw Art Museum, which acquired the painting through a donation from Clara Booth’s grandson, John Lord Booth I.

Perelma_Image

Conservation in-progress, April 2013 by Kenneth B. Katz, Conservation and Museum Services.

After receiving conservation treatment and a new frame, this painting of Clara Booth will accompany that of her husband, Henry Wood Booth, as well as their son George, his wife Ellen Scripps Booth, and Ellen’s father James Edmund Scripps. Financial support from John Lord Booth II affords this opportunity to join the painting of the Booth family matriarch with those of her relatives at Cranbrook House.

The artwork was painted in 1918 by Russian-born artist Ossip Perelma, known particularly for his portraits of men of stature such as President Woodrow Wilson, King Albert I of Belgium, and several Russian and French political officials. Perelma also executed the stately portrait of Henry Wood Booth, currently on view in the Oak Room.

Demure in size and executed with soft and fluid brush strokes, Clara Booth’s portrait contrasts with that of her husband. While Henry is depicted in full length in an outdoor background, his wife is shown only by profile, with just the upper half of her torso included in the composition. The stylistic distinction between Clara’s portrait and that of her husband—and indeed many of Perelma’s other subjects—emphasizes the differing approach Perelma took to depicting a woman.

In the early twentieth century, even women of position, beauty, and culture were often removed from public view after their role as wife and mother was fulfilled, and their youth had faded. This portrait was painted when Clara Booth was 79, and it is notable that Perelma chose not to conceal his subject’s age. Indeed, the portrait is a rare and significant example of art providing legitimacy and prestige to a woman who remained elegant and strong as she reached an age when most women no longer had a public presence or were being immortalized by artists.

Both portraits, Clara Gagnier Booth and Henry Wood Booth, will be available for viewing when Cranbrook House opens for public tours on Sunday June 14th! For more information on the tours check out the Cranbrook House & Gardens Auxillary website.

Stefanie Dlugosz-Acton, Collections Fellow, Center for Collections and Research

3 thoughts on “A Portrait Comes Home to Cranbrook House

  1. As a young child wondering (sic) the grounds, I sometimes pondered the names of various walkways; Rue de Gagnier was certainly a puzzler for many years. The story of how Henry pursued Clara back in Canada is quite charming; the CBF is all glad she accepted his overture (and that HWB didn’t do himself in had he been scorned)!

    That said, my mother once that her Great Grandmother Booth did not possess a pleasant demeanor (in sharp contrast to her Great Grandmother Scripps). To be fair, however, she attributed Clara’s disposition to a severe case of RA, if memory serves.

    Hats off to cousin John Lord Booth II for his continued patronage of the arts and interest in the Cranbrook saga.

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  2. Many thanks to cousin John L. Booth for his efforts in returning Clara to Cranbrook House. One of my most treasured Booth family heirlooms in a 1927 photographic portrait of Great Great Grandmother Clara, taken just 3 years before her death at Cranbrook Cottage, which now hangs in my office.

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