About Us

Welcome to the Cranbrook Kitchen Sink! A project of the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research, the Kitchen Sink is all about highlighting the history and culture of the Cranbrook Educational Community. This is where we explore the objects, photographs, and documents that make up Cranbrook’s history, bringing to light the important events and forgotten moments of all things Cranbrook.

As the repository for the 100+ year history of Cranbrook, the Center for Collections and Research is the umbrella organization for the Cranbrook Archives and Cranbrook’s historic houses. The Center also oversees the management of Cranbrook’s cultural properties, which is just a fancy phrase for the artifacts and objects that make up Cranbrook’s history.  The range of objects we work with is extraordinarily diverse, from the historic carriage housed at Cranbrook Garage  to the 80-year-old suites of furniture designed by Eliel and Eero Saarinen for the Cranbrook and Kingswood Schools that are still in use by students today.

While Cranbrook Archives is the repository for the 110+ year history of Cranbrook Educational Community, it is a department of the Center for Collections and Research. The Center also oversees the management of Cranbrook’s historic houses and the community’s cultural properties, the artifacts and objects that make up Cranbrook’s history. The range of objects we work with is extraordinarily diverse, from outdoor sculptures to tapestries to furniture designed by Eliel and Eero Saarinen for the Cranbrook and Kingswood Schools that are still in use by students today.

Contributors:

Kevin Adkisson is the current Collections Fellow for the Center. He arrived at Cranbrook in his beloved ’93 Volvo in August 2016 from the tiny state of Delaware, where he received his Master’s from the Winterthur Program in American Material Culture. Previously, an undergraduate degree in architecture from Yale got Kevin various gigs as a designer, researcher, and writer in New York and New Haven. His interests include postmodernism, IKEA, puns, and Dolly Parton. Although he misses the glitz and glamour of northern Delaware, he’s cautiously optimistic a few years outside of the Northeast Corridor will turn out alright.

Leslie S. Edwards has been the Head Archivist at the Cranbrook Archives for more than fourteen years.  She loves all things archival, from processing collections to assisting researchers, to uncovering fun facts to know and tell.  She can’t seem to escape research, and for relaxation, she often finds herself in archives, history museums, and even cemeteries while on vacation!   That is, if she is not spending time with Numero Uno – her daughter – or watching Top Chef.

Belinda Krencicki is the Associate Archivist at the Cranbrook Archives. She received her Master’s Degree in Library and Information Science, with an emphasis in Archives, Records Management, and Preservation  from the University of Pittsburgh in 2010. She also holds an undergraduate degree in History from Michigan State University (Go Green!). Her background is in collection management and development for environmental remediation, compliance, and labor records. These experiences have informed her interest in access to digital resources, as well as transparency. Belinda is an avid runner, ferocious reader, and part-time baker. A proud Michigander, she can always be caught trying to sneak off to one of the Great Lakes.

Laura MacNewman is an Archives Assistant at Cranbrook Archives. She is currently studying with Aberystwyth University in Wales for an MA in Archives Administration. Her interests include needlework, French language, reading history (1450-1600) and the gothic cathedrals of England and France.

Leslie S. Mio is the Assistant Registrar for the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research. Leslie has worked in the Museum field since 2001, previously at The Henry Ford and the Birmingham Historical Museum and Park. She received her Master’s Degree in Historical Administration from Eastern Illinois University and her Bachelor’s Degree from Saint Mary’s College (Go Belles!). In her spare time (what is that again), Leslie enjoys watching baseball – the Detroit Tigers or her sons’ teams – and spending time with her family.  Leslie’s favorite quote is from Thomas Alva Edison, “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.”

Gina Tecos is an Archivist who joined the Cranbrook Archives team in 2014. She received her Master’s Degree in Information, with an emphasis in Archives and Records Management from the School of Information at the University of Michigan and also holds an undergraduate degree in English from the University of the Pacific. She loves local history and rare books and was an archivist at the National Automotive History Collection at Detroit Public Library for several years. A California transplant, she enjoys spending as much time as she can on Lake Michigan (no shark-infested waters here!), perusing book stores, and exploring new places with her family.

Stefanie Kae Dlugosz-Acton was the 2014-2016 Collections Fellow for the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research.

Cheri Gay served as an Archivist for the Cranbrook Archives from 2009 to 2016.

Justine Tobiasz started as a graduate student volunteer before being hired as an Archives Assistant at the Cranbrook Archives from 2013-2015.

Gretchen Sawatzki served as the Associate Registrar for the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research from 2012 to 2014.

Shoshana Resnikoff was the 2012-2014 Collections Fellow for the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research.

Robbie Terman served as an Archivist for the Cranbrook Archives from 2009 to 2013.

5 thoughts on “About Us

  1. Wow and double Wow. I certainly knew about this blog but never paid much attention to that is until today. It is like a great novel…I can’t stop reading it–now all I need is a delicious glass of wine and the picture will be complete. Congratulations!
    Judy Lindstrom

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  2. Hello! I was wondering if there was anyone who I could contact directly about a sort of tapestry/mural mystery. It deals with what I believe is a tapestry “cartoon” that is very similar in style to the Herter Looms gothic revival type of tapestries included in the collection at Cranbrook. Any help would be appreciated!

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  3. I just came across this blog and found it very informative. As a member of the Booth family (Henry S. Booth branch) there are things even our own families do not know! There is a lot to learn about how everything got started and what was happening historically at the time. I am very proud of the accomplishments of my family and what they humbly sacrificed to give to the general public. I went to Brookside and to Kingswood school and I always appreciated the beauty that surrounded me on a daily basis. My husband and I are continuing the legacy of Cranbrook by creating crafts with integrity. Thank you for creating this blog. I look forward to reading it on a regular basis.

    Renee Booth Borek
    Austin, Texas

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  4. Trying to respond to your Asheville 1916 flood photo. The Chero-Cola bottling Co. was at 167 Southside Ave. This street used to intersect with Depot St, right at the river, which it no longer does. The Southern Railroad Depot station was on Depot St. We have lots of photos of the 1916 flood, but not this one, if you’d care to send us a scan of it we would love to add it to our collection. If you go to our database at ncroom.buncombecounty.org and put AA158 in the keyword box you will see another flood photo on Southside. Great thing you’ve done on the blog. Zoe Rhine, North Carolina Room, Pack Memorial Library

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